Facing Employment Discrimination Charges?

Mastandrea Law, LLC Can Help

If you are an employee who has suffered from workplace discrimination or retaliation from opposing it, our attorneys are here to help you fight back. With federal, state and local laws that protect your rights from being victimized at work, you don’t have to suffer any longer or be fearful of damaging your career.

Every year, more than 60,000 charges of employment discrimination are filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Rod Mastandrea Employment Discrimination in Cleveland

Workplace discrimination is a threat to your civil rights. It is illegal to discriminate against someone because of the person’s race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, genetic information, religion, political affiliation, or pregnancy under laws enforced by the (EEOC).

At Mastandrea Law, LLC, we are ready and equipped to help you achieve the best possible outcome if you are faced with workplace harassment, discrimination, or retaliation.

Workplace harassment or discrimination can impact employees outside of work affecting someone’s physical and mental health causing unwanted feelings of depression, anxiety, hostility, and resentment. If you are experiencing workplace discrimination it can be both confusing and overwhelming. You need a guide who has the experience and expertise to advise you on the next steps.

Our team is committed to fighting for the best possible outcome for each of our clients. Regardless of what type of workplace discrimination you have experienced, our attorneys can guide you through each step of the process and let you know exactly what to do to protect your civil rights.

You need a firm that fights for the employee, and that firm is Mastandrea Law, LLC.

At Mastandrea Law, LLC, we are ready and equipped to help you achieve the best possible outcome when faced with charges of employment discrimination.

Types of Employment Discrimination

Age Discrimination:

The EEOC defines age discrimination as treating someone unfavorably because of their age. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits age discrimination against people who are 40 years or above. The Ohio Revised Code also addresses age discrimination in Section 4112.4.

Disability Discrimination:

According to the EEOC, disability discrimination occurs when an employer or other entity covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act, as amended, or the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, treats a qualified individual who is an employee or applicant unfavorably because he or she has a disability. Section 4112.02 of the Ohio Revised Code addresses unlawful discriminatory practices, including disability discrimination.

Equal Pay/Compensation Discrimination

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women in the same workplace be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need not be identical, but they must be substantially equal. Title VII, the ADEA, and the ADA prohibit compensation discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, or disability. Section 4111.17 of the Ohio Revised Code also prohibits discrimination in payment of wages.

Genetic Information Discrimination

Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), took effect on November 21, 2009, making it illegal to discriminate against employees or applicants because of genetic information. Title II of GINA prohibits the use of genetic information in making employment decisions, restricts employers and other covered entities from requesting, requiring, or purchasing genetic information. It also strictly limits the disclosure of genetic information.

Harassment

Harassment is a type of employment discrimination that is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, (ADEA), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, (ADA).

Harassment is defined as unwelcome conduct that is based on race, religion, color, sex (including pregnancy, sexual orientation, or gender identity), national origin, age (beginning at 40 years), disability, or genetic information. Harassment is considered illegal when 1) enduring the offensive conduct becomes a condition of continued employment, or 2) the behavior is severe or pervasive enough to create an intimidating, hostile, or abusive work environment. Additionally, the law prohibits harassment against individuals in retaliation for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or lawsuit under these laws; or opposing employment practices that they reasonably believe discriminate against individuals, in violation of these laws.

National Origin Discrimination

The EEOC describes national origin discrimination as treating employees (or applicants) unfavorably because they are from a particular country or part of the world, because of ethnicity or accent, or because they appear to be of a certain ethnic background (even if they are not).

Additionally, national origin discrimination can include treating people unfavorably because they are married to (or associated with) a person of a certain national origin. At the state level, Section 4112.02 of the Ohio Revised Code addresses unlawful discriminatory practices.

Pregnancy Discrimination

According to the EEOC, pregnancy discrimination involves treating an applicant or employee unfavorably because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) forbids discrimination based on pregnancy when it comes to any aspect of employment. Section 4112.02 of the Ohio Revised Code addresses unlawful discriminatory practices, including pregnancy discrimination.

Race/Color Discrimination

The EEOC describes race discrimination as treating someone an applicant or employee unfavorably because he or she is of a certain race or because of personal characteristics associated with race (for example, skin color, facial features, or hair). Color discrimination is defined as treating someone unfavorably because of skin color complexion.

Additionally, race/color discrimination can include treating someone unfavorably because he or she is married to (or associated with) a person of a certain race or color. 4112.02 of the Ohio Revised Code addresses unlawful discriminatory practices, including race/color discrimination.

If you’re facing employment discrimination charges, don’t wait.

Call us today for a free consultation.

Religious Discrimination

The EEOC describes religious discrimination as treating an applicant or employee unfavorably because of his or her religious beliefs. The law protects both people who belong to traditional, organized religions, as well as those who have sincerely held religious, ethical, or moral beliefs. Additionally, religious discrimination can include treating someone differently because he or she is married to (or associated with) someone of a particular religion. At the state level, 4112.02 of the Ohio Revised Code addresses unlawful discriminatory practices, including religious discrimination.

Retaliation Discrimination

According to the EEOC, it is illegal to punish job applicants or employees for asserting their rights to be free from employment discrimination, including harassment. Asserting these rights is called “protected activity,” and it can take many forms. At the state level, Section 4167.13 of the Ohio Revised Code prohibits retaliation by employers.

Sex-Based Discrimination

The EEOC describes sex discrimination as treating an applicant or employee unfavorably because of that person’s sex, including the person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or pregnancy. Title VII prohibits discrimination against an individual based on gender identity, transgender status, or sexual orientation. Rule 4112-5-05 of the Ohio Revised Code discusses state laws regarding sex discrimination.

Sexual Harassment

It is illegal to harass an employee or applicant because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include “sexual harassment” or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. Although, harassment does not have to be of a sexual nature. It can include offensive remarks about a person’s sex. Sexual harassment is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Ohio Revised Code 4112.02, Ohio Administrative Code 123:1-49, the AntiDiscrimination Policy in State Government Executive Order 2011-05K.

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Discrimination

In Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, the Supreme Court ruled that firing individuals because of their sexual orientation or transgender status violates Title VII’s prohibition on discrimination because of sex. The law prohibits sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment.

Mastandrea Law, LLC represents employers who are facing charges of employment discrimination.

We’ll fight for the best possible outcome for you, the employer.

Employment Discrimination Trends Employers Should Know About

It’s no longer just about tangible damages like lost wages. More and more juries are focusing on emotional damages, which can include embarrassment, anxiety, loss of sleep due to the harassment or discrimination. This element makes handling these cases more complicated than it used to be, as emotional distress and damages are by nature more nuanced and oftentimes rely on the testimony of friends, family, and therapists.

Social media movements like the #MeToo movement have certainly brought greater attention to workplace harassment and discrimination. Social media makes it easier than ever for claimants to publicize their stories, whether true or not. Social media also creates a reality where a company’s reputation can be damaged more quickly than ever before, oftentimes without that company having the opportunity to defend itself. This is one of the reasons that working with an employment discrimination attorney is of utmost importance. The faster you as the employer can get in front of these situations, the better.

When you think of “accessibility” for the disabled, most people think of physical spaces. But in recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of plaintiff lawyers that go after companies whose websites are not accessible to the deaf and blind.